Further Reading

Blues:

Abbott, Lynn and Doug Seroff. Ragged but Right: Black Traveling Shows, “Coon Songs,” and the Dark Pathway to Blues and Jazz. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2012.

Abbott, Lynn and Doug Seroff. The Original Blues: The Emergence of the Blues in African American Vaudeville. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2019.

Abbott, Lynn and Doug Seroff. Out of Sight: The Rise of African American Popular Music, 1889-1895. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009.

Cowley, John. “West Indies Blues: An Historical Overview 1920s-1950s — Blues and Music from the English-Speaking West Indies.” In Nobody Knows Where the Blues Came From: Lyrics and History, edited by Robert Springer, 187–263. University Press of Mississippi, 2006.

Davis, Angela Yvonne, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday. New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1998.

Dunkel, Mario. “W. C. Handy, Abbe Niles, and (Auto)Biographical Positioning in the Whiteman Era.” Popular Music and Society 38, no. 2 (2015): 122–39.

Gussow, Adam. “‘Make My Getaway’: The Blues Lives of Black Minstrels in W. C. Handy’s Father of the Blues.” African American Review 35, no. 1 (Spring 2001): 5–28.

Handy, W. C. Father of the Blues: An Autobiography. Edited by Arna Bontemps. Reprint, 1969. Boston: Da Capo Press, 1941.

Harrison, Daphne Duval. Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920s. New Brunswick, N.J: Rutgers University Press, 1988.

Southern, Eileen. The Music of Black Americans: A History. 2nd ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 1983.

Wald, Elijah. Escaping the Delta: Robert Johnson and the Invention of the Blues. New York: Amistad, 2004.

Robertson, David. W.C. Handy: The Life and Times of the Man Who Made the Blues. University of Alabama Press, 2011.

Calypso & Mento:

Classical Music & Brass Bands:

Crawford, Richard. America’s Musical Life: A History. 1st ed. New York: Norton, 2001.

Garrett, Charles Hiroshi. Struggling to Define a Nation: American Music and the Twentieth Century. University of California Press, 2008.

Hazan, Margaret Hindle, and Robert M. Hazan. The Music Men: An Illustrated History of Brass Bands in America. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1987.

Hosler, Ned Mark. “The Brass Band Movement in North America: A Survey of Brass Bands in the United States and Canada.” Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1992. 

Danzon & Son:

Madrid, Alejandro L, and Robin D Moore. Danzón: Circum-Caribbean Dialogues in Music and Dance. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Hawaiian Music:

Troutman, John W. Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2016.

Jazz:

Brothers, Thomas David. Louis Armstrong’s New Orleans. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2007.

Kahn, Paul N. “Call of The Freaks: Luis Russell & Louis Armstrong, Musical Pals, An Illustrated History.” Dissertation, Graduate School – Newark Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 2018. 

Raeburn, Bruce Boyd. “Beyond the ‘Spanish Tinge’: Hispanics and Latinos in Early New Orleans Jazz.” In Eurojazzland, edited by Luca Cerchiari, Lauren Cugny, and Frank Kerschbaumer, 21–46. Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 2012.

Latin America & the Caribbean:

Chasteen, John. National Rhythms, African Roots: The Deep History of Latin American Popular Dance. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2004.

Cañardo, María. Fábricas de Músicas: Comienzos de La Industria Discográfica En La Argentina (1919-1930). Buenos Aires: Gourmet Musical, 2017.

Karush, Matthew B. Culture of Class: Radio and Cinema in the Making of a Divided Argentina, 1920-1946. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012.

Magaldi, Cristina. “Cosmopolitanism and World Music in Rio de Janeiro at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” The Musical Quarterly 92 (2009): 329–64.

McCann, Bryan. Hello, Hello Brazil: Popular Music in the Making of Modern Brazil. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.

Moore, Robin D. Nationalizing Blackness: Afrocubanismo and Artistic Revolution in Havana, 1920-1940. University of Pittsburgh Press, 1997.

Ospina-Romero, Sergio. “Recording Studios on Tour: Traveling Ventures at the Dawn of the Music Industry.” In Phonographic Encounters: Mapping Transnational Cultures of Sound, 1890-1945, edited by Eva Moreda Rodríguez and Elodie A. Roy. New York: Routledge, 2022.

Palomino, Pablo. The Invention of Latin American Music: A Transnational History. Oxford University Press, 2020.

Pedelty, Mark. “The Bolero: The Birth, Life, and Decline of Mexican Modernity.” Latin American Music Review 20, no. 1 (1999): 30–58.

Pineda Franco, Adela. “The Cuban Bolero and Its Transculturation to Mexico: The Case of Agustin Lara.” Studies in Latin American Popular Culture 15 (1996): 119–30.

Putnam, Lara. Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013.

Raeburn, Bruce Boyd. “Beyond the ‘Spanish Tinge’: Hispanics and Latinos in Early New Orleans Jazz.” In Eurojazzland, edited by Luca Cerchiari, Lauren Cugny, and Frank Kerschbaumer, 21–46. Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 2012.

Seigel, Micol. Uneven Encounters: Making Race and Nation in Brazil and the United States. Durham, NC; London: Duke University Press, 2009.

Minstrelsy:

Chude-Sokei, Louis Onuora. The Last “Darky”: Bert Williams, Black-on-Black Minstrelsy, and the African Diaspora. Durham, NC; London: Duke University Press, 2006.

Gussow, Adam. “‘Make My Getaway’: The Blues Lives of Black Minstrels in W. C. Handy’s Father of the Blues.” African American Review 35, no. 1 (Spring 2001): 5–28.

Lhamon, W.T. Raising Cane: Blackface Performance from Jim Crow to Hip Hop, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2000

Lott, Eric. Love and Theft Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class. Oxford University Press, 1993.

Rogin, Michael. Blackface, White Noise: Jewish Immigrants in the Hollywood Melting Pot. University of California Press, 1998.

Smith, Christopher. The Creolization of American Culture: William Sidney Mount and the Roots of Blackface Minstrelsy. University of Illinois Press, 2014.

Music Industries:

Brooks, Tim.  Lost Sounds: Blacks and the Birth of the Recording Industry, 1890-1919. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005.

Ethnic Recordings in America: A Neglected Heritage. Studies in American Folklife 1. Washington, DC: American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, 1982. 

Miller, Karl Hagstrom. Segregating Sound: Inventing Folk and Pop Music in the Age of Jim Crow. Durham NC: Duke University Press, 2010.

Spottswood, Richard K. (Richard Keith). Ethnic Music on Records: A Discography of Ethnic Recordings Produced in the United States, 1893-1942. Music in American Life. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1990.

Suisman, David. Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music. Cambridge, MA.; London: Harvard University Press, 2012.

Ward, Jonathan. Excavated Shellac: An Alternate History of the World’s Music (1907-1967). Mp3 collection plus liner notes, https://dust-digital.com/products/excavated-shellac-an-alternate-history-of-the-world-s-music-1907-1967.

Musical Instruments:

Conway, Cecelia. African Banjo Echoes in Appalachia: A Study of Folk Traditions. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995.

Dubois, Laurent. The Banjo: America’s African Instrument. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. 

Kotapish, Paul. “Back to the Future: At the Turn of the Last Century, the Stroh Was a High-Tech Wonder.” Strings Magazine, January 2002.

Mazow, Leo G., ed. Picturing the Banjo. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2005.

Peterson, Karen. “The Stroh Violin Played a Role in Early Music Recording and Are Still in Use Today.” Strings Magazine, June 2021.

Pilling, Julian. “Fiddles with Horns.” Galpin Society Journal 28 (1975): 86–92.

Ragtime:

Gilbert, David W. The Product of Our Souls: Ragtime, Race, and the Birth of the Manhattan Musical Marketplace. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2015. 

Samba:

Hertzman, Marc A. Making Samba: A New History of Race and Music in Brazil. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013.

Tango:

Matallana, Andrea. Qué Saben Los Pitucos: La Experiencia Del Tango Entre 1910 y 1940. Buenos Aires: Prometeo, 2008.

Transnational Music Traditions:

Chasteen, John. National Rhythms, African Roots: The Deep History of Latin American Popular Dance. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2004.

Conway, Cecelia. African Banjo Echoes in Appalachia: A Study of Folk Traditions. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995.

Denning, Michael. Noise Uprising: The Audiopolitics of a World Musical Revolution. Verso, 2015.

Dubois, Laurent. The Banjo: America’s African Instrument. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. 

Hertzman, Marc A. Making Samba: A New History of Race and Music in Brazil. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013.

Madrid, Alejandro L, and Robin D Moore. Danzón: Circum-Caribbean Dialogues in Music and Dance. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Magaldi, Cristina. “Cosmopolitanism and World Music in Rio de Janeiro at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.” The Musical Quarterly 92 (2009): 329–64.

Mazow, Leo G., ed. Picturing the Banjo. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2005.

Moore, Robin D. Nationalizing Blackness: Afrocubanismo and Artistic Revolution in Havana, 1920-1940. University of Pittsburgh Press, 1997.

Ospina-Romero, Sergio. “Recording Studios on Tour: Traveling Ventures at the Dawn of the Music Industry.” In Phonographic Encounters: Mapping Transnational Cultures of Sound, 1890-1945, edited by Eva Moreda Rodríguez and Elodie A. Roy. New York: Routledge, 2022.

Palomino, Pablo. The Invention of Latin American Music: A Transnational History. Oxford University Press, 2020.

Pedelty, Mark. “The Bolero: The Birth, Life, and Decline of Mexican Modernity.” Latin American Music Review 20, no. 1 (1999): 30–58.

Pineda Franco, Adela. “The Cuban Bolero and Its Transculturation to Mexico: The Case of Agustin Lara.” Studies in Latin American Popular Culture 15 (1996): 119–30.

Putnam, Lara. Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013.

Raeburn, Bruce Boyd. “Beyond the ‘Spanish Tinge’: Hispanics and Latinos in Early New Orleans Jazz.” In Eurojazzland, edited by Luca Cerchiari, Lauren Cugny, and Frank Kerschbaumer, 21–46. Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 2012.

Seigel, Micol. Uneven Encounters: Making Race and Nation in Brazil and the United States. Durham, NC; London: Duke University Press, 2009.

Vaudeville and Theater Circuits:

Abbott, Lynn and Doug Seroff. The Original Blues: The Emergence of the Blues in African American Vaudeville. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2019.

Knight, Athelia. “He Paved the Way for T. O. B. A.” The Black Perspective in Music 15, no. 2 (1987): 153–81.

Sklaroff, Lauren Rebecca. Red Hot Mama: The Life of Sophie Tucker. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018.

Sotiropoulos, Karen. Staging Race: Black Performers in Turn of the Century America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2006.

Washburne, Charles. Latin Jazz: The Other Jazz. Oxford University Press, 2020.

Women's History:

Brooks, Daphne A. Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2021. 

Davis, Angela Yvonne, Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith and Billie Holiday. New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1998.

Harrison, Daphne Duval. Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920s. New Brunswick, N.J: Rutgers University Press, 1988.

Sklaroff, Lauren Rebecca. Red Hot Mama: The Life of Sophie Tucker. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018.

Southern, Eileen. The Music of Black Americans: A History. 2nd ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 1983.

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